mha1

January 6th, 0255

Sometimes the old axiom "A Picture Is Worth A Thousand Words" really does hold true.. ;o)   Linked from www.drudgereport.com's main page.

 

Sometimes the old axiom "A Picture Is Worth A Thousand Words" really does hold true.. ;o)   Linked from www.drudgereport.com's main page.

 

January 5th, 1040

Months back a friend and fellow writer Mike Holt asked me if I had any images he could use in reference to the Death Railway in Kanchanaburi.  I linked him to my galleries and told him he could use whatever he wanted.  Back in the states I did book and album covers regularly, but not so much since being here so I was pleased to contribute.  The picture he selected was an image of a statue, someone else's art, and the background was turned to a solid white color, so it's not much of an accomplishment on my part.  Yet, Marc can be one heck of a writer when he's in his element so if you have an interest in the POW's of the Death Railway check out his new book, POW 921. You can order the book here.

 

Months back a friend and fellow writer Mike Holt asked me if I had any images he could use in reference to the Death Railway in Kanchanaburi.  I linked him to my galleries and told him he could use whatever he wanted.  Back in the states I did book and album covers regularly, but not so much since being here so I was pleased to contribute.  The picture he selected was an image of a statue, someone else's art, and the background was turned to a solid white color, so it's not much of an accomplishment on my part.  Yet, Marc can be one heck of a writer when he's in his element so if you have an interest in the POW's of the Death Railway check out his new book, POW 921. You can order the book here.

About the Book

This amazing story is about the horrendous experiences thousands of Australian POW’s endured at the hands of the cruel Japanese after their capture in Singapore in 1942. At first they were imprisoned at a camp just outside the infamous Changi jail where they became slaves carrying supplies to Japanese troops, or building a road through the center of the island. A year later many endured a grueling train trip north to Thailand where they were forced to work on the Burma Railway. The tortures, the hunger, and the constant terror they experienced are graphically described. This book is not for the faint-hearted. From Thailand, they were shipped to Japan to work in the coal mines at Omuta, just across the bay from Nagasaki. One of the prisoners describes what he saw and felt on that fateful day when the atomic bomb was dropped, and what happened afterwards. Readers will wonder how these brave Australian men could survive the many terrible tortures and deprivations imposed on them. This book will have you gasping at the cruel treatment the prisoners endured. You will also learn how the leaders of the Japanese and Allied armies acted and why so many men lost their lives defending a lost cause. You will not be able to put this book down.  You can order the book here. 

 

January 5th, 0120

Someone recently asked me why they should take such great care to achieve the sharpest images as a matter of routine.   I suppose it depends on what you hope do with your images in the future.   I've learned to enjoy going back through images taken years ago, and applying new software and new processing skills.   As software improves and your processing skills grow, images you once might have considered culling now take on a new value.  The image below was captured with a point and shoot compact, carefully braced for maximum sharpness/detail, and while the image was captured nearly 11 years ago I just now processed it using modern software.   Heck, it was even captured as a 3megapixel jpeg.  More, this is a 1:1 crop.  The little guy in the image is just several inches tall.   Bracing carefully and trying to ge the sharpest image I could benefitted me 11 years later.

 

Someone recently asked me why they should take such great care to achieve the sharpest images as a matter of routine.   I suppose it depends on what you hope do with your images in the future.   I've learned to enjoy going back through images taken years ago, and applying new software and new processing skills.   As software improves and your processing skills grow, images you once might have considered culling now take on a new value.  The image below was captured with a point and shoot compact, carefully braced for maximum sharpness/detail, and while the image was captured nearly 11 years ago I just now processed it using modern software.   Heck, it was even captured as a 3megapixel jpeg.  More, this is a 1:1 crop.  The little guy in the image is just several inches tall.   Bracing carefully and trying to ge the sharpest image I could benefitted me 11 years later.

Olympus C3000z  F5.6  1/320th  8mm  ISO 100

 

January 4th, 1915

The good news it the new banner/header appears to be working great with Firefox, but not with Internet Explorer.  We're working on it, so hopefully soon.

And while the web guys are working on the site yours truly is opening boxes and laying out the parts for a very cool workstation build.  Not much bigger than a shoebox, but with tons of power and lots of class.  This is going to be very nice when done and I'll be sharing it in a build article soon.  It appears you can have your cake and ice cream too!

 

January 4th, 1500

We've changed the header/banner to a flash based banner which shouldn't interfer with our galleries or blogs.  Let me know if you experience any problems.  Thank you.

 

January 4th, 0115

There are some issues with the banner/header displaying all of it's images at once, vs. rotating like it should.  This is only on some pages.  We're trying to fix it now.  The user galleries are experiencing some issues as well.  We hope to have them fixed very soon with a new style header/banner.

 

January 4th, 0110

A reader asked me how effective his new modern point and shoot would be for landscapes during his upcoming vacation.  In this case a picture is worth a thousand words.  This image was captured in June of 2000 in Northern Oregon using a 3mp compact point and shoot.  I think the image serviceable and I've never felt the need to apologize it came from a point and shoot compact.   "Being there" is everything.

 

A reader asked me how effective his new modern point and shoot would be for landscapes during his upcoming vacation.  In this case a picture is worth a thousand words.  This image was captured in June of 2000 in Northern Oregon using a 3mp compact point and shoot.  I think the image serviceable and I've never felt the need to apologize it came from a point and shoot compact.   "Being there" is everything.

Olympus C3000z  F3.5  1/640th  6.6mm  ISO 100

 

December 31st, 1030

My last written words of 2010!  When you consider that I write 50-53 weekly columns a year, 8000-10,000 words each, this nears over half a million words per year!  I wonder if that qualifies for being "prolific?"  Probably more like crazy.  So it's no wonder I've been mostly silent these last few weeks enjoying our holiday break.  Yet the pressure builds like steam in a teapot.  Allow me to explain:

Let's imagine my head is the teapot.  A bit fat one.  As I collect photographs of new destinations, form ideas for tutorials, thoughts for musings, plans for reviews, carefully select the most useful/interesting news articles, and sort through readers submissions and questions the pressure builds and builds until the rather limited space is quite full and bursting at the seams  When I can release this pressure on a weekly basis the pressure gets high, but never uncomfortable.  But go 2-3 weeks without a creative release and I'm ready to explode!

The explosion this year will be intense as we take this site and our weekly column in new directions hopefully offering more and more to the interested reader.  My primary focus is still on the beginning hobbyist, but over the last three years many of you "beginning hobbyists" have progressed into keen and/or advanced photographers.  With this in mind I'll be introducing more advanced tutorials and more pointed software and equipment reviews with the goal of serving those who have advanced, while still directly supporting the ever growing ranks of beginner digital photographers.

 

A future tutorial involving saving high ISO images using CS5, layers, history brush, levels, and noise reduction

 

A future tutorial involving saving high ISO images using CS5, layers, history brush, levels, and noise reduction

What can you do to help?  Readers submissions and questions really help make the column more interesting.  They answer questions many others have but might not have taken the time to ask, and the submissions share photographs others can expect from their like equipment and skills.  This is huge.  I'd love to see more Feature's, especially on destinations.  Email me if you need help putting one together. 

Equipment reviews have been the surprise draw of the year bringing more interest (hits per article) than any other area, and often all the other areas combined.  People are understandably careful when selecting equipment for purchase.  With that said I don't get free equipment from manufacturers.  I have to buy it.  Most of my purchases support my profession on a professional level so there's not much more than the occasional point and shoot compact purchase every year.  So.. if you live locally (Bangkok) and have a new piece of gear, a camera, printer, laptop, mouse, keyboard, bag, anything at all.. and would like to see it reviewed and shared with the readers, and don't mind loaning it to me for a few days, please email me and we'll make arrangements to give it a good review!

Starting next week, January 8th, we'll start back with our regular column and I'm already working on several articles including a leading edge computer build offering a very small footprint very powerful imaging workstation.  You won't want to miss this one.  The parts have just been delivered and I'll start assembly later today.  Several readers are working up Feature Destinations which are always a lot of fun, we have a small queue (but not nearly enough) readers submissions and questions ready to go, and I've rested enough to have a small list of Musing topics to write about.  There are also some software reviews in the works, image monitor reviews, and reviews on a super fast PCIe SSD (solid state disk) I'm excited about.   It should be a great year!

 

Starting next week, January 8th, we'll start back with our regular column and I'm already working on several articles including a leading edge computer build offering a very small footprint very powerful imaging workstation.  You won't want to miss this one.  The parts have just been delivered and I'll start assembly later today.  Several readers are working up Feature Destinations which are always a lot of fun, we have a small queue (but not nearly enough) readers submissions and questions ready to go, and I've rested enough to have a small list of Musing topics to write about.  There are also some software reviews in the works, image monitor reviews, and reviews on a super fast PCIe SSD (solid state disk) I'm excited about.   It should be a great year!

 

Breadbox size luxury case to be used in our next computer build

Thank you for visiting with us and a special thank you to those who share through Readers Submissions and Questions!  I'm looking forward to a Great New Year!

Happy New Year!