October 23rd, 1255

Today we made another trip to the countryside to see how the colors were doing.   When you move to a new locale there is an learning curve as you explore, investigate, and document places, times, and things.   We want to learn the best time to make the best photographs, and sometimes we'll want to come back and photograph certain scenes during the extreme ends of the seasons.   As you look at the two images below, do you wonder what they'll look like with several feet of snow and ice hanging from the branches?   I do, and if you hang with me throughout the year I'll share the results.

A Buddha in the woods in the Midwest?  Maybe the man who lived in the woods and built this structure in 1933 had a Thai wife?

 

Today we made another trip to the countryside to see how the colors were doing.   When you move to a new locale there is an learning curve as you explore, investigate, and document places, times, and things.   We want to learn the best time to make the best photographs, and sometimes we'll want to come back and photograph certain scenes during the extreme ends of the seasons.   As you look at the two images below, do you wonder what they'll look like with several feet of snow and ice hanging from the branches?   I do, and if you hang with me throughout the year I'll share the results.

Canon 5d Mark II, 24-70mm F2.8L USM  @F8  1/100th  51mm  ISO 400

 

A Buddha in the woods in the Midwest?  Maybe the man who lived in the woods and built this structure in 1933 had a Thai wife?

Canon 5d Mark II, 24-70mm F2.8L USM  @F8  1/50th  34mm  ISO 400

 

October 18th, 1220

A few hours ago Canon announced their new "EOS-1D X" which is positioned to replace both the Canon EOS-1DIV and the Canon EOS-1DSIII.  Are you scratching your head on this one too?  Chuck Westfal, Canon's technical advisor explains the new EOS-1DX will feature a new 18mb full frame sensor with a 12fps frame rate, an improved metering and auto focus system, ISO range up to an extended 204,800, and a claimed best in class image quality and noise levels.  There will be incremental improvements to the familiar 1D series bodies as well.  This all sounds great, but will this really replace both the 1DIV and 1DSIII?  Read below the two EOS-1DX images for my take on this.

 

A few hours ago Canon announced their new "EOS-1D X" which is positioned to replace both the Canon EOS-1DIV and the Canon EOS-1DSIII.  Are you scratching your head on this one too?  Chuck Westfal, Canon's technical advisor explains the new EOS-1DX will feature a new 18mb full frame sensor with a 12fps frame rate, an improved metering and auto focus system, ISO range up to an extended 204,800, and a claimed best in class image quality and noise levels.  There will be incremental improvements to the familiar 1D series bodies as well.  This all sounds great, but will this really replace both the 1DIV and 1DSIII?  Read below the two EOS-1DX images for my take on this.

Let's be honest, 18mps really is enough resolution for all DSLR needs other than the professional landscape and studio photographers.  And there's a large number of these photographers, for whatever reason, not willing to plunk down the high price of admission for a top of the line medium format system.  But if Canon could fill the difference between your typical DSLR user and the high end medium format genre, with a new "tweener" genre, they may have a huge success on their hands.

 

Remember this announcement?

 

If Canon is truly combing both of their professional 1D series DSLR's into a relatively low megapixel EOS-1DX, then they must have a new higher megapixel professional system, perhaps aimed at studio and landscape photographers, ready to fill the void.  Is this the "historic New Story" announcement we'll see on November 3rd?  I think it will be.

 

If Canon is truly combing both of their professional 1D series DSLR's into a relatively low megapixel EOS-1DX, then they must have a new higher megapixel professional system, perhaps aimed at studio and landscape photographers, ready to fill the void.  Is this the "historic New Story" announcement we'll see on November 3rd?  I think it will be.  

Let's be honest, 18mps really is enough resolution for all DSLR needs other than the professional landscape and studio photographers.  And there's a large number of these photographers, for whatever reason, not willing to plunk down the high price of admission for a top of the line medium format system.  But if Canon could fill the difference between your typical DSLR user and the high end medium format genre, with a new "tweener" genre, they may have a huge success on their hands. 

We know the current EOS lens mount is at it's limits, so a bigger more capable sensor would require a different lens mount and purpose built metering and AF systems to accomodate the landscape and studio photographers.  They could do this in a body size between their current 1D series and Leica's S2.  And if they could do it for under $10,000 with say 40mp's or greater?   And if it included new high end modern lenses, but could also mount existing EOS lenses?

I suppose we'll have to wait for November 3rd before we find out.

 

October 16th, 0330

Fall harkens.  I was back in the same area as last time, but one week deeper in the season.  There are more colors, deeper colors, and the mercury has since plunged significantly.  Fall really is a beautiful season, the clear blue skies combined with the color of the turning leaves and crisp temperatures imparts a feeling unlike other seasons. 

This time I have a bit of a story to tell.  It was windy, winds of perhaps 30-50 knots.  A tree had fallen across the road and I was the first car in a short line watiing for the backhoe to clear the road so we could proceed.  Our new family car was blocked in, it could go neither forward nor backwards.  To pass the time we exited the vehicle and went over to stare helplessly at the fallen tree as all the others were doing.  Not finding that particularly enjoyable we took a picture of our car.  I noticed the way the light reflected the green foliage off and through the windows and across the painted panels presented a bit of a challenge.  The angle of incidence was critical, one step either way and the image was unusable, but if I was in the exact right position we were rewarded wtih a usable image

 

This time I have a bit of a story to tell.  It was windy, winds of perhaps 30-50 knots.  A tree had fallen across the road and I was the first car in a short line watiing for the backhoe to clear the road so we could proceed.  Our new family car was blocked in, it could go neither forward nor backwards.  To pass the time we exited the vehicle and went over to stare helplessly at the fallen tree as all the others were doing.  Not finding that particularly enjoyable we took a picture of our car.  I noticed the way the light reflected the green foliage off and through the windows and across the painted panels presented a bit of a challenge.  The angle of incidence was critical, one step either way and the image was unusable, but if I was in the exact right position we were rewarded wtih a usable image

Canon 5d Mark II, 24-70mm F2.8L USM  @F8  1/50th  25mm  ISO 400

 

I'd just made this capture and turned away elsewhere when we heard this loud THUNK, the obvious sound of something heavy and soft hitting a car.  As I watched everyone looked at their cars and the signs of relief flashed across their faces.  Wait a minute, if it wasn't their cars then it... I checked the off-side and yes, it was our new car.  With 1211 miles on the odometer some large stray tree fruit fell from above and according to the body shop created near $1400 worth of damage.  An expensive photo outing!

After such an incident did I at least make a decent marketable capture?  Perhaps one or two, but I certainly made a few captures worthy of inclusion in my new Mid-West Fall Colors Portfolio.

 

I'd just made this capture and turned away elsewhere when we heard this loud THUNK, the obvious sound of something heavy and soft hitting a car.  As I watched everyone looked at their cars and the signs of relief flashed across their faces.  Wait a minute, if it wasn't their cars then it... I checked the off-side and yes, it was our new car.  With 1211 miles on the odometer some large stray tree fruit fell from above and according to the body shop created near $1400 worth of damage.  An expensive photo outing!

Canon 5d Mark II, 24-70mm F2.8L USM  @F8  1/320th  45mm  ISO 200

 

I'd just made this capture and turned away elsewhere when we heard this loud THUNK, the obvious sound of something heavy and soft hitting a car.  As I watched everyone looked at their cars and the signs of relief flashed across their faces.  Wait a minute, if it wasn't their cars then it... I checked the off-side and yes, it was our new car.  With 1211 miles on the odometer some large stray tree fruit fell from above and according to the body shop created near $1400 worth of damage.  An expensive photo outing!

Canon 5d Mark II, 24-70mm F2.8L USM  @F8  1/60th  32mm  ISO 400

 

After such an incident did I at least make a decent marketable capture?  Perhaps one or two, but I certainly made a few captures worthy of inclusion in my new Mid-West Fall Colors Portfolio.

Canon 5d Mark II, 24-70mm F2.8L USM   @F8  1/320th  63mm  ISO 400

 

After such an incident did I at least make a decent marketable capture?  Perhaps one or two, but I certainly made a few captures worthy of inclusion in my new Mid-West Fall Colors Portfolio.

Canon 5d Mark II, 24-70mm F2.8L USM  @F8  1/640th  25mm  ISO 400

 

October 13th, 1300

Fall moves closer to it's climax and I'm following along each day determined not to miss a single turning leaf.  Fall colors are one of those subjects that are here today, and long gone tomorrow.  Faster than you can imagine the temperatures will drop and the leaves along with them.  Tall trees once full with natures gift of bright colored leaves, quickly become nothing more than a collection of bare limbs waiting for the bitter cold of winter.  It's imperative we enjoy each day of fall because soon winter will hasten through our communities with the brunt force only mother nature can muster.  Don't let these last few beautiful weeks pass you by.  Load your families and photo equipment in the car and head out to capture those last days of fall.  You'll be glad you did.

 

Fall moves closer to it's climax and I'm following along each day determined not to miss a single turning leaf.  Fall colors are one of those subjects that are here today, and long gone tomorrow.  Faster than you can imagine the temperatures will drop and the leaves along with them.  Tall trees once full with natures gift of bright colored leaves, quickly become nothing more than a colllection of bare limbs waiting for the bitter cold of winter.  It's imperative we enjoy each day of fall because soon winter will hasten through our communities with the brunt force only mother nature can muster.  Don't let these last few beautiful weeks pass you by.  Load your families and photo equipment in the car and head out to capture those last days of fall.  You'll be glad you did.

Canon 5d Mark II, 24-70mm F2.8L USM  @F8  1/400th  45mm  ISO 100

 

October 10th, 1105

"What Kind of Camera Should I Buy"  is the title of my latest Musing.  Can someone else really tell you what kind of camera you should get?  Or are you best served arriving at your own answer?

 

"What Kind of Camera Should I Buy"  is the title of my latest Musing.  Can someone else really tell you what kind of camera you should get?  Or are you best served arriving at your own answer?