Steve,

On my way to work today I saw an advertisement for Nikon 2009 in Bangkok!  Has this happened already and if not, where is it going to be held?

Charles

 

Charles –

I don’t know but I will find out and I’ll try to post this information in the “Photography News of Interest” next week.

Thank you for the heads up!

Steve
 

Hello Steve, 

I'd like your opinion on this photo it was taken when I was in Australia. Can you tell me if you think my composition is good or bad and what do you think of the color and sharpness of the photo.

Charles

The first thing I thought when I opened this image is that the colors are very good.  This is typical of Nikon DSLRs.  The exposure is perfect.

Charles –

The first thing I thought when I opened this image is that the colors are very good.  This is typical of Nikon DSLRs.  The exposure is perfect.

But you asked about the composition and frankly I don’t care for it much.  I think your subject was very good, but the execution could have been much better.  I would have done perhaps two different things.  I would have found an angle where the railing extended from the bottom right of the frame and then extended the end of the pier out towards the left (in effect).. or I would have moved very close to the railing and aimed along its axis.  I think the technicals are great, but I would have looked for a more interesting perspective.

Even laying on the ground and shooting up.. would have added the texture and pattern of the sand and water.. and some interesting angles into the main subject.

I wish I could have been more helpful.


Steve

 

When I was in Australia a friend of mine gave me a flash gun for my Nikon, but it is not TTL.
 
Is there an adapter I can get to convert this unit so my camera uses it in auto mode?
 
It is an OK flash gun but I find that I have to constantly change its setting when I change scenery.
 
Charles

 

Charles –

There is no way I know of to make an aftermarket flash work with the camera's auto modes.

However, your flash probably has a “thyrister” which enables it to adjust the light output according to its own “auto” mode.  Almost all old style aftermarket flashes have these.  You should track down the manual and you’ll find there are probably two modes, full manual and auto.  The old style “auto” meant the flash would self-adjust its output over a “range” of distance and you’d use a sliding scale (I can see it on the back of your flash in the pics you attached) and a f-stop slider.  These are actually quite easy to use.  Personally I prefer full manual control and this is what I use 99% of the time when photographing weddings and events.

WARNING WARNING ! ! !  Many of these flashes have a trigger voltage which greatly exceeds that of a modern DSLR.  You need to get the manual and verify the trigger voltages before you use this flash.. or you might smoke your DSLR camera body.  Even if it’s worked a few times, it can still do this damage.  Really, get the manual and verify the trigger voltages

I hope this helps

Steve

 


Please submit your questions to QandA@Bkkimages.com  All questions will be answered and most will show up in the weekly column.