Hi Steve,

Thanks for all the tips on the landscapes. The remark about DOF being both in front and behind the focal point got the message through. Silly how something that obvious doesn’t register until someone points it out :p. I take it that in your favorite photo of deception pass your focal point was one of the logs on the beach? By the way, if you did these handheld AND HDR, how did you get the 3 or 4 shots you needed? Shutter bracketing, or just very careful positioning before and after adjusting the shutter speed?

Koen


Koen –

Yes, the small log in the middle.  I’ve learned to manipulate my camera controls by feel.  More, I know that every “click” of the wheel I use to adjust shutter speed equates to a certain value.  So, by bracing carefully against a solid object and employing good technique, I can manually capture the required images.  In Av mode I can also bracket and get the shots all at once at my max frame rate.  Only three, but newer models can bracket up to five values/shots.  In the future I will look for at least 5fps, preferably 8fps, to assist in capturing the images I need for handheld HDR.

Steve


Hi Steve

When you mention ultra wide angle, is that the Sigma lens you let me use at the Sanctuary of Truth?  For now I won’t be buying any new lenses soon, but if I do the next one will probably be a wide angle. How does the Canon 10-22 compare to the Sigma? The canon seems to be the better option of these two, being both faster and wider no? The price is about the same.

Koen

 

Koen –

Yes, the same lens.  The Sigma is a full frame 12-24mm.. which means it’s a real 12mm on a full frame camera, or 19mm on a APC-S camera like the 40d or 50d.  The Canon 10-22 is a lens designed for APC-S bodies.  It will not work on a full frame camera. So yes, on an APC-S camera it will be wider, but.. if you’re even considering the possibility of a full frame camera in the future then it’s hard to go wrong with the Sigma 12-24mm.

Steve

 

Steve

 

About the filters, I did put on a cheap filter as advised by the shop, one of the clear ones just to protect the glass. I don’t mind spending a few bucks on a better filter, but the thing is that I don’t really know what they do :o. What different kinds of filters are there? I know of polarizing and UV filters, but that’s it. I also don’t know what they’re used for really. Is it purely protection or is the image affected as well? From the link you sent me for the UV filter I guess it is. If you screw on a UV filter like that, do you always leave it on or are there circumstances where you would not want to use that filter? Makes more sense to buy a good filter if I know what to use them for :p 

Koen

 

Koen -

Ah, the great filter debate.  Professionals around the world argue over Filter or no Filter..  I personally don’t use filters in the studio or in very clean environments.  However, when traveling and out in the real world I do use filters as a protective measure.  In such cases I use UV filters or Skylight 1b filters.  Both provide very mild, barely noticeable, improvements when cutting through haze and help render true colors.. so these are perfect for protection uses as they hardly change anything at all.  I find I like UV filters in hot climes, and Skylight filters in the climes you’d expect to experience in North America.  Very small differences either way.  What is important is to buy the very best filter you can so as not to degrade the quality of your lens.  I would rather spit on my lens and wipe it clean with a shirtsleeve, than to put a cheap filter in front of it.  I always leave it on when not in the studio.

Steve
 

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