Hi!

I have a question: I have Canon gear, a 40D plus several  lenses (No L though). I went to the Canon service center several month  ago to inquire about the possibility to adjust the focus, only to be told that it would take them probably two weeks to do this. Reading your comments it looks like you had better service. I wonder if there  is anyone specific to contact, or what to do to get my gear inspected,  cleaned, checked and the focus adjusted?

Looking forward to hear from you!

Manfred

Pattaya
 

Manfred –

The Canon service center might be taking care of me on the same day for several reasons.  I am a CPS (Canon Professional Services) member, I'm using pro gear which they might be more familiar with for fine adjustment, and they might not have been really busy the few times I've been there.  In your case it sounds like they just gave you the standard time frame.  You might try calling them and making an appointment to get the adjustments done while you wait.  The only time I had to wait was the first time.  I dropped off four hard cases with three pro bodies and 19 lenses and their delivery service dropped them off at my condo that same evening.  They did an excellent job.  Every lens was optimized for the body and aperture I requested.  Great people!

They cleaned my bodies outside, inside including the mirror boxes and viewfinders, battery contacts, and flash card contacts.  They also cleaned the sensor.  Very well.

The lenses had the exteriors cleaned, switches cleaned, filters cleaned, and several disassembled and dust removed from inside.  Then, they were matched to the body and optimized at the requested aperture.

Everything looked brand new and I couldn't be more pleased.

If you can't get the service you desire, ask to talk to a manager vs. the reception girls.  In my case the service manager comes out every time to chat and ask me specific questions to best meet my needs.

I hope this helps.

Steve

 

Steve,

I have noticed that when I take photos in raw at night time or where there is some very dark areas in the photo they rarely look like what I took or what they looked like in Lightroom or Photoshop but on the LCD screen on the camera they looked great.

Here are two examples from photos I took last night.

Here are two examples from photos I took last night.

No processing was done apart from re-sizing the image and converting it to jpg.

No processing was done apart from re-sizing the image and converting it to jpg.
 
Charles
 

Charles –

I’m not sure I understand what you’re asking.  If you see an image in Lightroom or Photoshop.. then that is what you should be exporting to a jpeg file.

The first image (69a) appears that the sun is so bright that the camera compensated by underexposing as much as it could, the rest of the scene.  What mode where you using?  I’m guessing program or auto?  If Aperture priority or manual you should be able to control it for exactly the exposure you want using the rear LCD screen.

There is always ‘some’ difference between your LCD and what you see in your editing software, this is why you should always use the histogram as your final reference.  However, if there is a drastic difference between the two the something might be wrong with your camera.

The second image (80a) I can’t comment on because I see no signs of anything standing out and I don’t know what you saw with your eyes.  I can guess that you were using an automatic mode and it cued in on the brightest lights in the same way as the first image. 

Can you give me some more information?

Steve

 

Steve

Both images were taken in full manual mode, both of the images the histogram is pushed to the left and there is no data after the center of the graph.

69a was taken at 6.53pm. Aperture was 1.6 seconds and f5.6, the bright light was a spot light over the lake.

The second was taken at 7pm, it was of the Mo Chit BTS station from the park. Aperture was 1.3 seconds and f5.6,

I used to take many photos like these in JPG form without problems.

I am going to go back there on Sunday night and try again and take 2 photos one in raw and the other in jpg fine mode and send you the 2 files so you can see what I mean.
 
Charles

 

Charles –

If this is the case them you simply metered incorrectly.  As you know the histogram should be almost touching the right side.  If it’s to the left then you should have seen this when making the capture and corrected.

This has absolutely nothing to do with jpeg vs. raw.  Raw files contain jpeg thumbnails (this is what shows up on your LCD and anywhere thumbnails are shown in Windows Explorer and other imaging programs) and while sharpness, contrast, and even color can change according to your in-camera jpeg settings.. exposure will not.  These are both exposure issues.

When you go back forget about taking exposures in RAW/Jpeg.. and instead observe your histogram vs. your LCD.  Expose to the right (just up to but not touching) and once there THEN observe the image on LCD.  You can adjust to your taste from there.

Without seeing the scene with my own eyes I can’t tell you if your settings were correct.  The only thing I can tell you that’s rock solid is if your histogram is to the left, then you’re severely underexposed.

I hope this helps

Steve

 

Steve

Thank you for your advice, I was able to go back out there last night.
here are 2 files.

 

Thank you for your advice, I was able to go back out there last night.

I know one the Histogram doesn't go all the way to the right but if it did, for me there was to much light.

I know one the Histogram doesn't go all the way to the right but if it did, for me there was to much light.

But I am very happy with the results.

Charles
 

Charles –

These are much better!  I’m glad you’ve got the hang of using the histogram.  You’re absolutely right, at night if you expose to the right as you would in a daytime shot then the image will be too exposed for a nighttime shot.  Still, it’s a great starting place and from there using your LCD you can get pretty close to what you want.  Don’t forget to bracket 3-5 exposures once the LCD is showing what you’re pleased with.  Often, the LCD representation won’t be what you see back on your computer, so bracketing is useful for making sure you got the exposure you wanted.

Steve
 

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