Steve

Had another crack at the HDR image of the sanctuary of truth. Tried to sort of replicate the image that you made with the raw files I gave you. It’s not exactly there, but not too bad I’d say. It’s better than the oversaturated image I conjured up the first time anyway :p.

KVW

 

 

 

KVW -

I think this is a lot nicer.. perhaps a bit understated.

Remember.. with any image really worth anything.. the devil is in the details.

Often the 'look' of an image is more the result of many small details, than an overall processing step.

For instance on this particular image.  Chances are we both HDR processed it very close to the same.  Still, the 'look' is different.  Why?

Because:

Lens and distortion compensation differences

Many small details hand 'painted' in the scene.  Look closely and you'll start to be able to pick these out.  Perhaps as many as 50-60 details.  Each detail is individually painted to it's own level of luminance and color which sets it apart, but not too far apart, from the neighboring details.  This is why I'll often work in a 1:1 zoom with the localized editing tool in Lightroom, or different layers in Photoshop, and then go back through the details varying the opacity/luminance of each for the maximum effect.

And then there's the very obvious limitations of your monitor.. you can't see them on your end.. but I certainly can on this end.

Really.. you've got enough photo gear and even skill for now.. you're next area of major improvement will be that which you enable through being able to see with your eyes.. which means a monitor.. and when it comes to the small details you're probably being hampered by the slow mind numbing creativity sucking that happens when forced to use an underpowered machine for processing.

You see.. processing is an artistic process.  Your computer/monitor shouldn't get in the way any more than someone holding their hands over the eyes of a painter.. or banging trash can lids while a mathematician tries to form a new algorithm.. anything that impedes or distracts from the creative process.. or hampers in such a way to discourage.. takes a huge toll.

And this is even more huge with someone like me who is artistically challenged to the point I have trouble drawing a stick figure..

What I'm trying to say.. Dude, you're getting a Dell  ;o) ...

Steve

 

Steve,

Just got back from a few days on Koh Chang.  Experienced some inconveniences with my photo taking and although not a new phenomena for camera buffs here in LOS, it was an annoyance and I'd like to hear what your recommended solution (other than the obvious ones) might be.
 
Situation:  Camera sits in air conditioned room or car and when taken out of the AC environment for photo taking the lens accumulates condensation and makes photo taking inop for a period of time until the condensation evaporates.

MTS International

 

Hi MTS International-

I've covered this one a few times in the column.. a situation that many have asked about.

The easiest way is to just give your camera time to adjust.. or keep it sealed tight in it's case while in the room.. let the air leak in slowly as you drive to your destination..

Steve

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