Steve

Sitting here in BKK enjoying a big thunder storm with lots of wind, some rain and I am very relaxed.

This has given me some time to put together a few questions about the use of LR4 and CS5 that perhaps you can help me with.

Following you tutorial when using CS5 for Selective Saturation on a picture I use the following steps:

1. Load picture

2. Go to IMAGE; adjust to liking using tone, contrast & color.

3. Then to adjustments, black and white, click OK.

4. Open history brush and replace a color or colors as desired.

The problem is that the replaced color does not have the same depth, brightness or brilliance as the original such as shown on your son’s helmet.

Why, what am I missing?

Here is an extreme example of what I am getting.

In reference to the band pictures in your posting of April 1 I have a question. Your use of high ISO settings with no apparent noise is amazing. Is it a factor of lens/camera quality, post processing or just knowing how to do it the right way. The latter I would assume.

Thanks in advance for any help.

Rickster

 

Following you tutorial when using CS5 for Selective Saturation on a picture I use the following steps:

The problem is that the replaced color does not have the same depth, brightness or brilliance as the original such as shown on your son’s helmet.

 

Here is an extreme example of what I am getting.

Here is an extreme example of what I am getting.

 

 

Rick –

Looking at these images and what you wrote I can’t think of anything you’d be doing wrong except maybe your flow and opacity settings on your history brush are not at 100%?

I processed one of your images using the steps you provided and it turned out well.

Steve

 

Looking at these images and what you wrote I can’t think of anything you’d be doing wrong except maybe your flow and opacity settings on your history brush are not at 100%?

 

Steve –

You nailed it as usual. My setting were wrong. How they changed only the picture God knows.

Now set at Mode normal, Opacity 100%, Flow 100%.

If the offer you made is still good I may send you the Fuji X S1 for your evaluation in a few weeks.

Screen shot below.

 

rq6

 

Thanks so much

Rick

 

Steve,

I just got my kindle fire and came ion your sure when searching for away to import phone numbers from my verizon serviced motorola droid into the kindle and also how to text nescafe on the kindle. If this is possible, could you send me step by step instructions? I am not a techy. I appreciate your time.

Sandy

 

Sandy –

I’d love to help you but I’m not sure I can without your phone right in front of me. There is no “standard” for doing this so it’s a matter of trying different things.

What I can do is lead you in the right direction. This is the big picture of what you want to do.

1. Export your current phone numbers to a file outside your phone.

2. Import that file into your Kindle.

The smaller picture will have some roadblocks such as:

a. The file you export from your current Droid needs to be compatible with what the Kindle can handle. I can tell you the Kindle uses Vcards. Look for an Android application, contact manager, contact assistant, or something that allows you to output your current contact list to the Kindle. There will be at least several such utilities, some free, some shareware, so I’d start with your Verizon tech support and ask this question “how can I export my contacts in Vcard format for another Android device to import.” Verizon makes several such utilities and has several “how to” tutorials on their site. Ask them to point you to the right one.

There are also basic Android aps that do this. You can google “Android contact manager” “Android Contact Assistant” and so forth and you’ll find what you want.

Also, think about a master contact list and where you’d manage it. You can do this using Windows 7 contact manager, Microsoft Outlook, or just your phone if you must. From this master contact list you can export your contact information in a format you’re end device (a new phone, a Kindle, new computer, etc) will recognize. For example, I keep my personal and business contact lists in Microsoft Outlook. I use Systools (http://www.vcardexport.com/) Vcard export to transfer and sync my contacts from Outlook to all my devices.

So.. this is why all these software companies are out there selling these small utilities. They earn a decent living doing this.

I’m not sure what Nescafe is.. so I can’t help you there either.

I’m sorry I couldn’t be more helpful.

Steve

 

Steve:

Of course, as always, I have a number of questions that perhaps you can help with.

Reds. Both wife and I have noticed that the photos of red are never clear and show a lot of what seems blurred, for the want of a better word. Little detail, just mashed together and not clear. This is also seen in the bright yellow and oranges but not near the same degree as with reds.

I am sending a few pictures that represent the red issue we see.

As ask before the BAND pictures you took a few weeks ago are great. How were you able to control noise when using such high ISO settings?

Use of zoom lenses. Should a photo taken at 300 mm be as clear and sharp as the same one taken at 50 mm? Take a shot of a horse at 300 mm that fills the frame then walk up to the horse and shoot again at 50 mm.

Assuming all the correct camera settings, tripod etc what should be the results? Same results?

Rickster

 

Rick –

About Reds:  Red has several issues. Red is the most difficult color for digital sensors to render accurately. More, it’s difficult to expose properly. Some of your samples were slightly overexposed, some not well focused. You are familiar with your histogram? Put these samples in LR and observe the red channel in the histogram and see if it’s pushing too far to the right. With reds, proper exposure is key.

About low noise band pictures: Most people are convinced they need the latest new camera to get better noise performance, but as you noticed I was using an 8 year old basically obsolete DSLR. Any time you have to correct an exposure you induce noise. Nailing the perfect exposure during capture is vital when using higher ISO’s. I can get better noise characteristics from an 8 year old obsolete DSLR which is properly exposed, than the newest DSLR a stop off. So exposure is critical.

Also, white balance. The conventional wisdom is if you shoot raw, you can make changes to white balance and suffer no image degradation from doing so. This is true, but only about 90% of the time. It’s the other 10% of the time you need to worry about and it’s often not mentioned because it takes some skill to deal with. If your white balance is really off towards one end, say 9000k, and you’re shooting at the other end of the spectrum, say 2200k, there could be, depending on the camera and the colors in the scene, a possibility you’ll blow a color channel when making the WB correction. Red is the color channel most often blown. Also, if you’re shooting at a more moderate 5500k (daylight) and you need to correct to say 4000k, the exposure of one or more color channels could change just enough to induce a heck of a lot of noise if you’re at the limits of your cameras ISO capabilities.

So.. in this order for the lowest noise in high ISO scenes:

1. Set a custom white balance

2. Nail your exposure

3. Edit your image as little as possible, sharpening and exposure especially adds a great deal of noise.

4. Use a quality noise removal software sparingly

Also, keep in mind that if you take a 4000x3000 pixel image with x-noise present, and reduce the size to say 800x600, then the noise present will be much smaller and ‘appear’ as less noise. In other words, my web images might look noise free, and they might print noise free up to 8x10 inches. But by 11x14 and larger they’ll certainly exhibit noise.

About lens sharpness at 300mm:

This depends on three variables:

1. Quality of the optics

2. If the lens is braced adequately (the longer the focal length, the more critical the bracing)

3. What the air conditions are.. for instance, a picture of wildlife 200 meters away could have smoke, haze, and other kinds of environmental factors present.

If all 1-3 above are true, the lens is of the same optical quality, it’s perfectly braced, and the air conditions are clean.. then yes. But the practical answer is the longer the focal length the more difficult it is to get a sharp well focused image because it’s much more difficult to hold the camera still at 300 than 50mm..

About Tripod use:

Yes, with a caveat. Longer focal lengths mean more bokeh. More bokeh makes the focused area of the image ‘appear’ sharper. So with longer focal lengths done right, they’ll appear sharper. And.. longer focal lengths are often available with very high quality optics.. so say a 300mm F4 lens (you can get a nice used one for your Nikon for about $900) will make sharper images (used correctly) than a standard mid-length zoom or 50mm lens. A 300mm F2.8 (now you’re talking $4000-$5000 used for a recent model) being a more expensive lens, will be made to higher standards.

Good shooting!

Steve

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