If you have a great scene and good light almost any camera will do the job.  This image was captured in 1999 with a first generation 3mp digital compact point and shoot.  I’ve kept images from this small point and shoot for over ten years because they’re good images.  At the time of these shots and post of my travels I also carried a 35mm film camera.  Digital was the new kid on the block and 3mp’s was considered barely enough to make a decent 5x7” print.  As software and print technology increased right along with camera technology, these image files can now easily make very nice 11x14” prints.

Olympus C3000z F3.6  1/640th  6.6mm  ISO 100

If you have a great scene and good light almost any camera will do the job.  This image was captured in 1999 with a first generation 3mp digital compact point and shoot.  I’ve kept images from this small point and shoot for over ten years because they’re good images.  At the time of these shots and post of my travels I also carried a 35mm film camera.  Digital was the new kid on the block and 3mp’s was considered barely enough to make a decent 5x7” print.  As software and print technology increased right along with camera technology, these image files can now easily make very nice 11x14” prints.

This image is significant because it shows you the camera is the last thing you should be worrying about, it shows you even with a first generation point and shoot, over a decade old, what really counted was being at the right place at the right time and paying attention to your composition.  It also didn’t hurt that the Olympus C3000z allowed manual controls which I took advantage of.

While my 35mm SLR was mounted on a sturdy tripod and the scene carefully considered, I took my new ‘toy’ from my pocket and snapped the same scene handheld.  I only took one image of each scene, the idea was to compare the film and digital images side by side and I really didn’t expect any great results from digital.  At the time you could have called me a ‘Digital Skeptic’ and not been wrong.  Still, it never hurts to investigate new technology, you never know where it will end up..

 

This image isn’t nearly as good.  I was standing in the same place, pointing the camera in the same general direction, but there are different elements in the composition.  The small beach, train trestle, and balance of the Feature Photograph above, isn’t present in this second image.  I didn’t even move my feet between images, I just swiveled my waist a bit more to the right. The exfil shows a difference of three minutes between the two images.  Enough time for the mist from the first image to burn off.   What a difference!

Olympus C3000z F6.3  1/500th  6.6mm   ISO 100

This image isn’t nearly as good.  I was standing in the same place, pointing the camera in the same general direction, but there are different elements in the composition.  The small beach, train trestle, and balance of the Feature Photograph above, isn’t present in this second image.  I didn’t even move my feet between images, I just swiveled my waist a bit more to the right. The exfil shows a difference of three minutes between the two images.  Enough time for the mist from the first image to burn off.   What a difference!

When making a capture try to take the time to really ‘look’ at the scene.  Look at it from all angles, standing, sitting, all directions, up/down, and carefully consider all elements.  Mentally note the elements and when choosing the scene ask yourself which of these components you’ll incorporate.

You often spend much money and weeks or days getting to a location.  Spend a few more minutes to evaluate the scene once you arrive.  Always consider the exposure, consider your eyes are seeing one exposure but your camera can create another.  Know your tools and what they can do.  Artistically and efficiently manage your equipment and scene, and you’ll be rewarded with images you won’t forget a decade or two later.