A short time ago my friend Rob visited me and he’d just come from the local camera shop which justified the huge smile on his face.  Eyeing the heavy bag from the camera store I queried “the new Canon 1d Mark IV?”  He nods and then says “but that’s not all..”  Soon he’d unboxed Canon’s new 17mm TSE (tilt shift lens) which is a huge chunk of glass, even bigger than my Canon 85mm F1.2L USM.  I’ll admit it, as he was turning it over in his hands seeing it for the first time my fingers were itching and the desire to hold and examine this lens was overwhelming.  He gave me that knowing smile, not quite sure if he understood my desire to see this masterpiece, or perhaps he was just feeling a bit of sympathy because I haven’t yet added it to my own lens collection, and then passed it over to me where I gave it a good look.  What can you say when you observe a talented photographer unwrapping a great new camera body and lens?  Easy.  “I can’t wait to see the pictures!”

Canon 1d Mark IV, 180mm F3.5L  USM Macro @F5.6 1/100th  ISO 1600

 

A short time ago my friend Rob visited me and he’d just come from the local camera shop which justified the huge smile on his face.  Eyeing the heavy bag from the camera store I queried “the new Canon 1d Mark IV?”  He nods and then says “but that’s not all..”  Soon he’d unboxed Canon’s new 17mm TS-E (tilt shift lens) which is a huge chunk of glass, even bigger than my Canon 85mm F1.2L USM.  I’ll admit it, as he was turning it over in his hands seeing it for the first time my fingers were itching and the desire to hold and examine this lens was overwhelming.  He gave me that knowing smile, not quite sure if he understood my desire to see this masterpiece, or perhaps he was just feeling a bit of sympathy because I haven’t yet added it to my own lens collection, and then passed it over to me where I gave it a good look.  What can you say when you observe a talented photographer unwrapping a great new camera body and lens?  Easy.  “I can’t wait to see the pictures!”

 

This butterfly was captured in Surat Thani and is one of the very first “test” images from his Canon EOS 1d Mark IV.  We need to take this in context.  Such shots are usually painstakingly captured with a tripod mounted camera, external shutter release, macro lens, and usually an external strobe.  This image was captured hand held, on a whim, with nothing more than a good observant eye.  The Canon 1d Mark IV did a great job at high ISO’s/  And its darn near perfect.  The butterfly head, body, and antenna are in sharp focus allowing it to stand out from the rest of the colorful scene which is fading into a very nice bokeh.

 

I’m not a fan of insect shots, but I know when I like one.  The angle of the insect is perfect, the yellow flowers give a pleasing yet sharp contrast, and the green leaves provide another layer of color.  Properly processed it really presents wellMaybe next time he’ll share some shots using the 17mm F4L TS-E.

 

This is what you can expect from all of Rob’s work if you visit his site  and take a gander around.  Or, you can join him on our site for a African Kruger trip report parts one and parts two, or maybe join him on the Great Wall Of China?   or read his interview here.