As most of you know the feature photograph section is usually reserved for one of my personal images used to illustrate a point of significance.  I can count on one hand in the last two years images other than mine that ran here, Stick's excellent Nana night scene with the tuktuk and Rod's recent two images from his mining camp.  This isn't to say readers don't send in great images because they certainly do, but somewhere in my mind the synapsis of matching an image to a significant point must take place before a readers image is selected for a feature photograph.  This image from Biker Bart did just that, it's an excellent image on both a compositional and technical scale, and the synapsis of image to significant point took place with clarity!

 

As most of you know the feature photograph section is usually reserved for one of my personal images used to illustrate a point of significance.  I can count on one hand in the last two years images other than mine that ran here, Stick's excellent Nana night scene with the tuktuk and Rod's recent two images from his mining camp.  This isn't to say readers don't send in great images because they certainly do, but somewhere in my mind the synapsis of matching an image to a significant point must take place before a readers image is selected for a feature photograph.  This image from Biker Bart did just that, it's an excellent image on both a compositional and technical scale, and the synapsis of image to significant point took place with clarity!

This image is significant because it's an outstanding example of matching two unlike subjects in the composition, but where the subjects almost morph in a close likeness of each other.  This type of photograph is often interesting to a viewer and they don't even know why.  In this photograph the sleek sporty lines of the vintage BSA cycle mirror the sleek sporty lines of the model.  The light green cast melds them even deeper, while the models attitude of self-assuredness mimics the very purpose of a military edition cycle.  They go together like chocolate and peanut butter.

This composition also follows my three basic rules for a composition.  A foreground (front tire), a mid-ground (model) and the background window with tools on the wall.  The lighted deck is largely unnecessary in this composition other than to serve as a light source which looks a lot better than any on-camera flash would provide.  Unfortunately the front tire is cropped a bit too tight otherwise flawing a near perfect image.

I've always talked about keeping your eyes open for unique and/or interesting photographic opportunities.  As a spectator walks through a car or bike show they encounter literally hundreds of subjects to photograph.  Invariably they just snap away and one spectators images end up looking like the next spectators images UNLESS a certain spectators eyes are open and he's paying attention such as in this case.  A change in perspective, an event taking place, a movement, a momentary change in lighting.. something changes providing the observant spectator with the opportunity to make a unique capture.  Biker Bart had his eyes open and had the artistic talent to put the pieces together.  I wonder if he knows how effective he was?  He does now..