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BigJoe has submitted two other articles, “An Amateurs Perspective of the Four Seasons in South Korea”, and “Krabi Thailand, South West Monsoon.”  

Now BigJoe is penning a daily diary of his current visit to Thailand in real time.  He’ll send me his daily submissions and I’ll add them to this article where the last piece submitted will be listed first.  BigJoe’s articles are always fun and informative so you will want to follow his travels and see how he experiences Thailand.

 

January 7th, 2012

 

Automobiles kept pace while countless colors flashed by in a blur backdropped by grey buildings that lightly contrasted with the pale sky. Arriving at Suvarnabhumi airport after a long uneventful flight from Seoul I had decided to try the Airport link to Makkasan Station and take a few photographs along the way.  The trains platform is located on the airports lowest level and can easily be found following the blue directional signs.  I purchased my one way express ticket for 90 baht and was guided to the platform by the friendly and overly helpful staff.  During my seven-minute wait, with only two other passengers on the platform, I began to wonder if this had been a good idea.  The adjacent platform to Phaya Thai station was much busier and seems to be the route of choice.  After boarding, the trip took under 15 minutes during which I took shots of the inside of an empty car while attempting to capture the passing landscape.

On arrival at Makkasan station I waited briefly for the two other riders to clear the platform and started taking shots of the empty space.  This is when a platform security officer approached and waved me off saying in his best english, “No Pictures”.  Already having the shots I wanted, I nodded and departed the empty station with my bags in tow.  Directly outside was a taxi stand with two waiting cabbies.  When I asked them to go by meter to my hotel they directed me to the taxis on the street about 150 meters away.  Sticking to my principle of only using metered taxis I unhappily wheeled my bags to the heavily congested street.  Traffic in the near side lanes was moving in the opposite direction from where I needed to go and I wondered how I would cross to the other side.  I found my answer in the entrance to the Bangkok Subway located about 100 meters down the sidewalk.  Not wanting to sit in the slow moving traffic and knowing my hotel was a short walk from the Asok station I decided the subway was a better option. 

Checking into my hotel about twenty minutes later I sighed and relaxed a bit logging the experiences into my memory.  The city taxi drivers had effectively countered the alternative mode of transportation making it a quick trip to inconvenience.  In the future I may use the link again if I have less bags as the inconvenience lies with getting from the station to another form of transportation.  Something is clearly wrong with how this station layout was planned and I doubt the planners took into consideration the stubborn taxi drivers.  Having a connection to the subway or a legitimate taxi stand would be a step in the right direction.  Possibly in time the taxi drivers will come around and realize that shorter trips from the station has the potential to net more fares and tips while consuming less fuel.  A passenger may even be inclined to tip more knowing that he saved money on the expressway tolls alone.  As for “no pictures” in the train station, I understand security concerns, but tourists take pictures.  Being told they can’t snap a few shots of how they arrived will most certainly engrave a negative picture in their minds as first impressions are lasting.  I’ll end with two shots of my initial entry into Bangkok, an empty train car and a deserted Makkasan station.

 

Arriving at Suvarnabhumi airport after a long uneventful flight from Seoul I decided to try the Airport link to Makkasan Station in order to do some photography along the way. The train is located on the lowest level and can easily be found following the blue direction signs. I purchased my one way express ticket for 90 baht and was guided to the platform by the friendly and overly helpful staff. During the seven-minute wait for the train only two other passengers showed up and I started to wonder why. The adjacent platform to Phaya Thai station was much busier and seems to be the route of choice. After boarding, the trip took under 15 minutes during which I took shots of the inside of an empty car while attempting to capture the passing landscape through the windows.

Canon EOS Rebel Ti2; EF 24-70mm f2.8 L USM; f 3.5 at 1/8th sec 24mm (38.4mm equivalent) ISO 200

(Camera braced on seat back)

 

On arrival at Makkasan station I waited briefly for the two other riders to clear the platform and started taking shots of the empty space. This is when a platform security officer approached me waving me off saying “No Pictures”. Already having the shots I wanted, I nodded and departed the empty station with my bags in tow. Directly outside was a taxi stand with two waiting cabbies. When I asked them to go by meter they directed me to the street about 150 meters away. I wheeled my bags to the street where I found the entrance to the subway. Not wanting to sit in the slow moving traffic and knowing my hotel was near Asok station I decided to take the subway.

Canon EOS Rebel Ti2; EF 24-70mm f2.8 L USM; f 8.0 at 1/50th sec 25mm (38.4mm equivalent) ISO 100

(Camera resting on suitcase)

 

 

January 8th, 2012

Waking after a night out I cleared the cobwebs with some good spicy Thai food, grabbed the camera bag and headed out to retrace some old footsteps.  The skies were clear and blue and the streets full of people. Activity on the streets can produce appealing images and I find the vantage of the sky train platforms provide an interesting perspective of the city.

 

Remembering a trip here in 2009 trip I retraced my footsteps to where my interest in the hobby was most likely borne. I had just purchased my first DSLR and was here on vacation. During a brief outing to Benjakiti Park I shot everything on auto and remember being amazed at the clear images especially at night. Possessing a better understanding of the camera’s settings I intended to recapture similar images using the manual with me in controlling the settings.

Canon EOS Rebel Ti2; EF 24-70mm f2.8 L USM; f 8.0 at 1/200th sec 38mm (60.8mm equivalent) ISO 200

(Handheld)

Retracing footsteps I found my way to Benjakiti Park.  It was the summer of 2009 and I had recently purchased my first DSLR.  I had made my way around the park snapping shots with the camera set on automatic mode.  When I returned from the trip and pulled he images up on the monitor I was amazed at the quality and clarity. I recall thinking the night shots were amazing and I hadn't used a flash.  Now, having gained a few years of experience with the settings I intended to recapture similar images with me controlling the camera setings in manual mode.

 

Benjakati Park is located off of Ratchadaphisek road about 200 meters south of the Asok sky train station (top picture). Smaller than Lumphini Park it covers less than two square kilometers and is open to the public daily. Visited by both Thais and foreigners it offers a relaxing locale in the city center for exercise or other activities. There are two circuits around the parks large lake, one for pedestrian and the other bicycle traffic.

Canon EOS Rebel Ti2; EF 16-35mm f2.8 L USM; f 11 at 1/125th sec 16mm (25.6mm equivalent) ISO 100

(Handheld)

Benjakati Park is located off of Ratchadaphisek road about 200 meters south of the Asok sky train station (top picture).  Smaller than Lumphini Park it covers less than two square kilometers and is open to the public daily.  Visited by both Thais and foreigners it offers a relaxing locale in the city center for exercise or other activities.  There are two circuits around the parks large lake, one for pedestrian and the other bicycle traffic.

 

This popular location for amateur photographers saw several out shooting images of their friends and the parks well-maintained landscape. During my outing I concentrated on experimenting with the late afternoon/early evening sunlight from different angles. I also like how the skyline surrounding the lake adds an attention-grabbing backdrop to the scenes. Throughout the park there are plenty of angles for interesting compositions where you can capture near, mid and far subjects in a single image. I circled the lake taking advantage of as many vantages as I could, ending with shots of the setting sun from the east side of the lake. Thanks for stopping by and be sure to check in again as I’ll be retracing my footsteps to other interesting locations during the upcoming weeks.

Canon EOS Rebel Ti2; EF 16-350mm f2.8 L USM; f 11 at 1/50th sec 21mm (33.6mm equivalent) ISO 100

(Handheld)

This popular location for amateur photographers saw several out shooting images of their friends and the parks well-maintained landscape.  During my outing I concentrated on experimenting with the late afternoon/early evening sunlight from different angles.  The skyline surrounding the lake also adds an attention-grabbing backdrop to the scenes.  Throughout the park there are plenty of angles for interesting compositions where you can capture near, mid and far subjects in a single image.  I circled the lake shooting from as many vantages as I could, ending with shots of the setting sun from the east side of the lake.  Thanks for stopping by and be sure to check in again as I’ll be retracing my footsteps to other interesting locations during the upcoming weeks.

 

January 9th. 2012

Following my footsteps from two years ago I boarded the sky train at Nana station made the change to the Silom line at Siam station enroot to Saphan Thaksin station.  I exited the western end of Thaksin station down the stairs to Sathon Pier.  Here a long tail boat can be hired as transportation or for a tour of the river and canals of Western Bangkok.  My plan was to follow my path from two years ago on a short loop of the canals.  This was not to be as the countries water management system has been regulating water flow through the canals and the water gates that access the river were closed.  I could and did take a ride down the river during sunset where I captured today’s images.  The price of the boats is negotiated with the gentleman on the pier and can be hired for one person or a group.  The easiest way to get their attention is to stand looking interested in one of the river tour signs found on the pier.  It is almost guarantied that someone will approach and offer you a tour of the river.  Both of the times I have rented a boat I was the only rider as I wanted the driver to slow down to allow me to shoot without inconveniencing others.  It is also my assumption that added movement of others would “rock the boat” so to speak resulting in a higher chance of motion blur.

 

From the pier the driver skillfully guided the craft along the agreed upon rout 30 minutes downriver and back. The first shot is of a tanker that sat next to a dry dock. I wasn’t going to include it because it is severely underexposed even after increasing the exposure. But, since Steve really likes boats and I really like the clarity, colors and reflection of the sun that sat low on the horizon to my rear I decided I would share it.

Canon EOS Rebel Ti2; EF 16-35mm f2.8 L USM; f 11 at 1/200th sec 16mm (25.6mm equivalent) ISO 100

(Handheld)

From the pier the driver skillfully guided the craft along the agreed upon rout of 30 minutes downriver and back.  The first shot is of a tanker that sat next to a dry dock.  Initially I wasn’t going to include it due to it being severely underexposed.  Even after increasing the exposure. it is too dark.  But, since Steve really likes boats and I really like the clarity, colors and reflection of the sun that sat low on the horizon to my rear I decided I would share it anyway.

 

The second image is of the sun setting between two large ships. Throughout the trip the boat driver made sure slow when I put the camera to my eye but with the strong current I still had to be quick to choose my shots with adequate settings.

Canon EOS Rebel Ti2; EF 16-35mm f2.8 L USM; f 11 at 1/100th sec 16mm (25.6mm equivalent) ISO 200

(Handheld)

The second image is of the sun setting between two large ships.  Throughout the trip the boat driver made sure slow when I put the camera to my eye but with the strong current I still had to be quick to choose my shots with the adequate settings.

 

The third image is of the bottom side of the Rama III Bridge with the Krungthep Bridge in the background. I was trying not to go below 1/30th of a second shutter speed throughout the trip in order to reduce motion blur. Not wanting to sacrifice f-stop I instead adjusted the ISO to compensate. The results were mixed as shots 90 degrees to the port or starboard at 1/30th sec were all blurred and the darker it got the more noise showed even at ISO 6400.

Canon EOS Rebel Ti2; EF 16-35mm f2.8 L USM; f 11 at 1/30th sec 16mm (25.6mm equivalent) ISO 800

(Handheld)

The third image is of the bottom side of the Rama III Bridge with the Krungthep Bridge in the background.  My goal throughout this excursion was to not to set the shutter below 1/30th of a second in order to reduce motion blur.  During post processing I realized that this was still too slow for most shots and I could have increased ISO or decreased an f-stop or two to obtain better results. 

 

I’m including this last image because I like it. It shows the Sathon Tower behind Wat Yannawa (The Boat Temple) with an eerie sky filled with noise. I think it gives the image a ghostly appearance, which is ironic as the tower is know by locals as the “Ghost Tower”. It’s construction halted and has been abandoned since the 1997 Asian financial crisis. As the light dimmed I could have sacrificed a few f-stops but was trying to avoid this to see how the images would look. The long tail boat ride is quickly becoming a favorite of mine as it is a relaxing way to spend a couple of hours and the photographic possibilities are seemingly endless.

Canon EOS Rebel Ti2; EF 16-35mm f2.8 L USM; f 11 at 1/30th sec 16mm (25.6mm equivalent) ISO 6400

(Handheld)

I’m including this last image because I like it.  It shows the Sathon Tower behind Wat Yannawa (The Boat Temple) with an eerie sky filled with noise.  I think it gives the image a ghostly appearance, which is ironic as the tower is know by locals as the “Ghost Tower”.  It’s construction was halted and it has been abandoned since the 1997 Asian financial crisis.  The long tail boat ride is quickly becoming a favorite of mine as it is a relaxing way to spend a few hours while providing countless photographic opportunities.

 

 

January 10th, 2012

Described by some as the “Farang Ghetto” of Bangkok it is lined with a mix of modern high-rises and aging structures.  Shaded by it’s overhanging sky train, Sukhumvit Road cuts its way through a cornucopia of hotels, storefronts, condominiums, restaurants, bars and much more.  While walking the street with my camera looking to capture the essence of this unique neighborhood I found it challenging to put together a composition.  The subjects were there but the opportunity for a good shot was often fleeting.  Several attempts were spoiled as traffic or people moved into the frame at the time of capture, blocking the subject or ruining the composition.  For my personal growth more practice and patience is needed with these candid city shots.  In the interim I will stick to focusing on the architecture and landscape.

 

Today’s first shot is taken from Soi 10 next to a small park in the direction of Sukhumvit. A walk down one of these small Alleys (Soi) is sure to take you into another world all together. Each Soi is different and may cater to an individual ethnicity, be lined with bars and street vendors or be the home of the rich, middle and lower class all living within meters of one another.

Canon EOS Rebel Ti2; EF 24-70mm f2.8 L USM; f 11 at 1/320th sec 24mm (38.4mm equivalent) ISO 200

(Handheld)

Today’s first shot is taken from Soi 10 next to a small park facing Sukhumvit Road.  A walk down one of these small Alleys(Soi) is sure to take you into another world all together.  Each Soi is different and may cater to an individual ethnicity, be lined with bars and street vendors or be the home of the rich, middle and lower class all living within meters of one another.

  

The second picture of the day is of an old district that’s in the early stages of transformation. Washington Square was here long before my first visit to the city and has long been in a state of decline. Memories imparted to me by retired Sergeant Majors who visited Thailand when “Pattaya’s streets were paved with sand and clay” tell of a more prosperous time in the square. As for myself, over the past ten years I’ve enjoyed frequenting Bourbon Street and The Dubliner, which as I understand it, are at some stage of moving to new locations.

Canon EOS Rebel Ti2; EF 24-70mm f2.8 L USM; f 11 at 1/80th sec 24mm (38.4mm equivalent) ISO 100

(Handheld)

The second picture of the day is of an old district that’s in the early stages of transformation. Washington Square was here long before my first visit to the city and has long been in a state of decline. Memories imparted to me by retired Sergeant Majors who visited Thailand when “Pattaya’s streets were paved with sand and clay” tell of a more prosperous time in the square.  Over the past ten years I’ve enjoyed frequenting the Bourbon Street Restaurant and Bar and The Dubliner Irish Pub.  As I understand it both are at differing stages of moving to new locations.

 

The Squares Texas Lone Star Salon window still advertises “Food Wimmin Likker” but like the majority of its establishments is barricaded shut. The adjacent door hangs open with stairway behind leading to empty rooms that may have at one time been discrete meeting places. It’s uncertain as to what will become of the square, as it seems one side is being gutted while the other remains untouched. From an outsiders view, the transformation of the square may very well symbolize changes in the expat community’s relationship with Thailand becoming evident in the “Farang Ghetto” of Bangkok.

Canon EOS Rebel Ti2; EF 24-70mm f2.8 L USM; f 11 at 1/30th sec 35mm (56mm equivalent) ISO 400

(Handheld)

The squares Texas Lone Star Saloon's window still advertises “Food Wimmin Likker” but like the majority of other establishments here it is barricaded shut.  The adjacent door hangs open with the stairway behind leading to empty rooms that may have at one time been discrete meeting places.  It’s uncertain as to what will become of the square, as it seems one side is being gutted while the other remains untouched.  From an outsiders view, the transformation of the square may very well symbolize changes in the expat community’s relationship with Thailand that are now becoming evident in the “Farang Ghetto” of Bangkok.

 

 

January 11th, 2012

 

As the sampans rested in the lock the water gate to our front rose in order to permit entry into the canals of western Bangkok. This my second trip on the river this week was going as planned taking me into the canals that had recently been inundated by flood waters in order to save central Bangkok. The canals were built to regulate water levels passing through to the Gulf. Today they were doing their job and the water in the canal was about a half meter lower than the river.

Canon EOS Rebel Ti2; EF 24-70mm f2.8 L USM; f 8 at 1/60th sec 70mm (112mm equivalent) ISO 400

(Mounted to monopod)

As the sampans rested in the lock the water gate to our front rose permitting entry into the canals of western Bangkok.  This my second trip on the river this week was going as planned taking me into the canals that had recently been inundated by flood waters in order to save central Bangkok.  The canals were built to regulate water levels passing through to the Gulf.  Today they were doing their job and the water in the canal was about a half meter lower than the river.

  

As we moved through the canals I remembered, from a previous trip, the location of the floating market, bridges and Buddha I wanted images of. Taking the time to preplan what you want to shoot can save allot of time and missed opportunities. I had previewed the route on Google Earth prior to leaving my room and was ready with the proper lens and angle for better shots. The above image is of a floating market entrepreneur making his way out to ambush me into buying some trinkets. We settled on drinks for me any my driver and were on our way.

Canon EOS Rebel Ti2; EF 16-35mm f2.8 L USM; f 2.8 at 0.300 sec 16mm (25.6mm equivalent) ISO 1600

(Mounted to monopod)

As we moved through the canals I recalled from my previous trip the location of the floating market, bridges and Buddha I wanted to get images of.  Taking the time to preplan what you want to shoot can save allot of time and missed opportunities.  I had previewed the route on Google Earth prior to leaving my room and was ready with the proper lens and angle for better shots.  The above image is of a floating market entrepreneur making his way out to ambush me into buying some trinkets. We settled on drinks for me any my driver and were on our way.

 

Because this trip was to last until after dusk and I was on a moving boat I had a new variable to deal with in order to get quality shots. Motion blur caused by shooting while moving can be difficult to conquer especially in low light. I decided it would help to have a stable platform so I brought along my monopod. I had fitted it with a flat rubber boot that kept it from sliding or scratching the smooth surfaces of the boat. I also made camera adjustments to increase the shutter speed sacrificing f-stops and ISO as it got darker. This worked until it became too dark and motion blur became part of the composition in the above image. As I wrap up my stay in Bangkok and move on to the Islands I look forward to returning and taking more sampans out onto the river and canals.

Canon EOS Rebel Ti2; EF 24-70mm f2.8 L USM; f 8 at 1/80th sec 28mm (44.8mm equivalent) ISO 200

(Mounted to monopod)

Due to the fact that this trip was on a moving boat and would last until after dusk new variables factored into capturing quality images. Motion blur caused by shooting while moving can be difficult to conquer especially in low light.  I decided it would help to have a stable platform so I brought along my monopod.  I had fitted it with a flat rubber boot that kept it from sliding or scratching the smooth surfaces of the boat.  I also made camera adjustments to increase the shutter speed sacrificing f-stops and ISO as it got darker.  This worked until it became too dark and motion blur became part of the composition in the above image.  As I wrap up my stay in Bangkok and move on to the Islands I look forward to returning and taking more sampans out onto the river and canals.

 

 

January 12th, 2012

  

Today’s shots are all from the walkway above Sukhumvit Road at the Asok sky train station. This is area has undergone a great deal of change since my first visit to Bangkok. The new Grand Center Point Hotel and Terminal 21 shopping center towers over where old shops and bars once stood. A few of the old buildings still stand but who can tell how long they last. Will the growth of the city bring a new type of tourist? I believe it already has. Families and couples of all ages now walk the street where at one time a mix of drunken sailors and roughnecks looked to get rowdy in one of Bangkok’s renowned bar areas.

Canon EOS Rebel Ti2; EF 16-35mm f2.8 L USM; f 8 at 1/100th sec 35mm (56mm equivalent) ISO 200

(Handheld)

Today’s shots are all from the walkway above Sukhumvit Road at the Asok sky train station.  This area has undergone a great deal of change since my first visit to Bangkok.  The new Grand Center Point Hotel and Terminal 21 shopping center towers over where old shops and bars once stood.  A few of the old buildings still stand but who can tell how long they last.  Will the growth of the city bring a new type of tourist?  I believe it already has.  Families and couples of all ages now walk the street where at one time a mixture of drunken sailors and roughnecks looked to get rowdy in one of Bangkok’s renowned bar areas.

  

The mix of old and new gives Bangkok its unique feel and can be seen everywhere. Vendors line their food carts in front of a Starbucks or down a small soi adjacent to a 5 star hotel. Some of the more predominant establishments keep their walkways clear but the tide of Thai entrepreneurs continues to slowly eat away at their borders.

Canon EOS Rebel Ti2; EF 16-35mm f2.8 L USM; f 10 at 1/80th sec 35mm (56mm equivalent) ISO 200

(Handheld)

The mix of old and new gives Bangkok its unique feel and can be seen everywhere.  Vendors line their food carts in front of a Starbucks or down a small soi adjacent to a 5 star hotel.  Some of the more predominant establishments keep their walkways clear but the tide of Thai entrepreneurs continues to slowly eat away at their borders.

  

A thing I find good about the change is that you can now walk above the street from the Times Square Building all the way across Asok Road. This walkway has been kept clear of vendors and loiterers with stairs leading to both sides of the street in several locations. From the Times Square building you can see Nana Station. Wouldn’t it be nice if the bridge joined the two stations? You could then stroll along one of the busiest stretches of Sukhumvit without being bothered. And if this came to be, how would the tailors tout their suits… by trampoline?

Canon EOS Rebel Ti2; EF 16-35mm f2.8 L USM; f 9 at 1/125th sec 16mm (25.6mm equivalent) ISO 200

(Handheld)

Something positive that have discovered with the change is that you can now walk above the street from the Times Square Building all the way across Asok Road.  This walkway has been kept clear of vendors and loiterers with stairs leading to both sides of the street in several locations.  From the Times Square building you can see Nana Station.  Wouldn’t it be nice if the bridge joined the two stations?  You could then stroll along one of the busiest stretches of Sukhumvit without being bothered. Imagine if this came to be... how then would those tailors tout their suits… by trampoline?

 

January 13th, 2012

As I walked the length of Ao Nang beach I noticed a definite difference from when I was here just last June.  With high season in full swing the beach was lined with long tail boats on and off loading passengers while further down families lay in the sun.  The road was busy with sam-lor, pedestrians and shop owners out selling their wares.  Surprisingly the weather was the only thing not so different.  June had been the monsoon season and with daily rains, usually in the late evenings.  At the hotel the staff tells me that during this time of the year it rains daily as well but during mid afternoon.  So far this has held true and during my excursion along the beach I snapped away at the scenery with the dull grey clouds as a backdrop.  My intent during the week I have here is to capture images away from the beach of the limestone peaks and local community.  This plan remains in place but as Krabi has awesome sunsets I grabbed my camera and headed to the closest stretch of beach just as the sun was going down.  The next four photos were all taken within a 100-meter stretch and I’ve placed them in the order of captured.

  

The beach is Nopparattara Beach located about a kilometer west of Ao Nang Beach.  On the east end of the beach a small inlet empties into the sea where several long tail boats park for the night.  Today the tide was out and the water was very low allowing me to walk along the stranded boats.  A stretch of sand blocked the waves at the mouth of the inlet and the still water the boats sat in provided reflections that add a new dimension to the composition.

Canon EOS Rebel Ti2; EF 16-35mm f2.8 L USM; f 6.3 at 1/160th sec 23mm (36.8mm equivalent) ISO 200

(Handheld)

The beach is Nopparattara Beach located about a kilometer west of Ao Nang Beach.  On the east end of the beach a small inlet empties into the sea where several long tail boats park for the night.  Today the tide was out and the water was extreemly low allowing me to walk along the stranded boats.  A stretch of sand blocked the waves at the mouth of the inlet stilling the water where the boats sat provided reflections that add a new dimension to the composition.

  

As I passed the first boat I turned and captured the above image.  I believe that I could have shot from almost any angle with great results.

Canon EOS Rebel Ti2; EF 16-35mm f2.8 L USM; f 5.6 at 1/40th sec 16mm (25.6mm equivalent) ISO 800

(Handheld)

As I passed the first boat I turned and captured the above image.  I believe that I could have shot from almost any angle with great results.

  

I continued along the water shooting as I went with the anticipated view of the sunset just beyond the rocky outcrop.  This shot shows how the water gets shallower and you can cross over to the beach at low tide.  All of these images are unedited save a minor crop, angle correction and size reduction for send over the internet.  This image might benefit by increasing its exposure with a graduated filter or brush, something I will work on after my vacation.

Canon EOS Rebel Ti2; EF 16-35mm f2.8 L USM; f 4.5 at 1/60th sec 16mm (25.6mm equivalent) ISO 400

(Handheld)

I continued along the water shooting as I went with the anticipated view of the sunset just beyond the rocky outcrop.  The mouth of the inlet shallowed to an easily wadable depth providing easy access to the beach beyond.  Up to this point in my submissions I have been doing very little post processing to my submissions.  A minor crop, angle correction along with size reduction for sending over the internet has been the extent of my work.  The benefit I am gaining from submitting a daily journal is the expert advice from Steve and his most recent and most eye opening advice to date is that post processing is almost a necessity with digital images. Look for more processing in upcoming submissions. 

 

The final image is from the beach with the tide low and sun under the horizon.  Another photographer was out with his camera on a small tripod working hard to get that perfect shot of the sunset.  I doubt he could hear me clicking away behind him nor do I think he realize he was the subject of my composition.  This so far is my favorite image of the trip. Hope you will enjoy it as much as I am.

Canon EOS Rebel Ti2; EF 16-35mm f2.8 L USM; f 4.5 at 1/40th sec 16mm (25.6mm equivalent) ISO 400

(Handheld)

This final image is from the beach with the tide low and sun under the horizon.  Another photographer was out with his camera on a small tripod working hard to get that perfect shot of the sunset.  I doubt he could hear me clicking away behind him nor do I think he realized he was the subject of my composition.  This so far is my favorite image of the trip. Hope you will enjoy it as much as I am.